Archaeology of Communications conference

Organised by the Computer Networking and Telecommunications Research Centre and supported by Manchester Branch

Date:
Saturday 3 March 2012

Time:
9.15am - 5.00pm

Venue:
MediaCityUK, University of Salford, Manchester, M50 2HE

Cost:
£25

Speakers:
Professor Martin Hall, Vice Chancellor, University of Salford
Mike Nevell, Director, Centre of Applied Archaeology, University of Salford
John Liffen, Curator, Science Museum, London
Pauline Webb, Curator, Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester
Eric Grove, Professor of Naval History, University of Salford
Wayne Cocroft, Senior Archaeological Investigator, English Heritage

Synopsis:

This conference is aimed at a general public audience and will examine the archaeological impact of communications technology from early canals to today’s digital revolution.

The exciting new development at MediaCityUK in Salford marks the latest transformation of this important area. With the creation of the Manchester Ship Canal this part of Salford became the famous Salford and Pomona Docks, a thriving inland port feeding the world’s first planned, and Europe’s largest, industrial estate at Trafford Park. Now in the 21st Century, the area has further evolved to become a national centre for the digital media and broadcasting industries through the creation of MediaCityUK. This evolution reflects how technology and in particular, technology that allows us to communicate with one another, has and continues to transform our lives and the landscape in which we live. The canals of the early industrial revolution not only enabled goods and people to move more quickly between major cities but they helped those very cities grow and become what they are today. The railways were the catalyst to develop a means of communicating using electricity and from these early telegraphs emerged the telephone. Printing presses and a transportation network heralded the arrival of mass communications which was further expanded through radio and television. Computers and digital communications have brought us the Internet, World Wide Web and mobile phones. But what evidence remains of this evolution?

This event is supported by the Manchester Branch and is organised by the Computer Networking and Telecommunications Research Centre and the Centre for Applied Archaeology at the University of Salford. It is part of the Manchester Histories Festival (24 February to 4 March 2012).

Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

This event could be part of your CPD, including as part of the CPD process for Chartered status. Further details can be found at www.bcs.org/cpd

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