Be inspired! Projects at the edge of human understanding

Post Christmas blues? Be inspired and uplifted for 2016 at the next PROMS-G (BCS Project Management Specialist Group) meeting on Wednesday 20th January 2016 at the BCS premises in Southampton Street near Covent Garden, London.

Project Eye fears that the ‘Big Physics’ in the title of the presentation ‘Lessons on Project Management from Big Physics projects’ might scare off some of our more mature colleagues who may have wounding memories of their tussles with physics at school - it can’t just be Project Eye, can it? In any case it would be a shame to miss this important event.

Let’s put the physics aside for one moment. Despite all the mind-blowing technologies involved in the projects discussed, the focus of this event is on project management. The speaker, Janet Smart, hails from the Saïd Business School in Oxford and works with the Major Projects Leadership Academy (MPLA). MPLA has been tasked by the UK government with delivering a compulsory course for all top civil servants who act as project sponsors (or ‘senior responsible owners’ in government jargon). So we might just get some inkling of what they are being taught.

The ‘physics’ projects in question are massive, innovative, engineering undertakings. What is more the whole point of the machines that they create is to generate data. Big physics really is big data with a vengeance - with all the IT and computing challenges that brings.

Let’s give some idea of the scope of these projects. One is the completed Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) at Sudbury - sadly in Ontario rather than Suffolk. SNO involved the creation of a neutrino particle detector which at its core has 1,000 tonnes of heavy water in a container located in a cavity large enough for a ten-storey building in a disused mine 2070 metres below the ground level.

SNO Detector

SNO Detector during construction (Photo courtesy of SNO)

The other, currently under development, is the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), an international programme to build the world’s largest radio telescope, which will eventually consist of a million square metres of dishes and antennas. We IT people will be gratified to know that the configuration will require supercomputers faster than any in existence today and network technology that will generate more data traffic than the existing internet.

Project Eye hopes to see you on the 20th January 2016!

Square Kilometre Array (SKA)

(Photo Courtesy of SKA Organisation)

Further event details and booking

The Square Kilometre Array

The Square Kilometre Array Facebook page

Sudbury Neutrino Observatory 

There are no comments on this item

Leave Comment

Post a comment

Search this blog

December 2017
M
T
W
T
F
S
S
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31