Good behaviour, walking the talk and getting parents involved

Zoe RossWhat is it? E-safety. We recently caught up with two individuals that have been helping schools with their e-safety plans and approaches. We asked Zoe Ross and Yvonne Walker about what they feel teachers should consider.

Zoe’s tips for effective e-safety

Zoe Ross is an expert in computing and was involved in the successful Barefoot Computing Project. She is now CPD coordinator for the Computing at Schools Network of Excellence and continues to help schools and to provide advice. Here are her tips:

  • Don’t make a crisis out of a blip. Appreciate that children and young people do make mistakes and it’s part of the process of becoming digitally literate. Deal with incidents appropriately and calmly.
  • A school’s overall behaviour culture has a huge effect on e-safety. If behaviour is positive then it is usually far easier to be effective in e-safety.
  • Involve students in drafting your e-safety rules. Using the right language and tone means they’ll be more persuasive and effective.
  • Walk the talk, don’t just write the policy. A good e-safety policy is important but no use if you don’t ensure everyone is aware of it and implementing it.
  • Keep staff up to date. Technology changes fast, so run regular training sessions for staff and ensure they model good e-safety behaviour.

Yvonne’s tips for effective e-safety

Yvonne is the National Hub Coordinator for Computing At School. Prior to this she worked as a Local Authority ICT consultant, primary teacher and computing subject leader. She’s also helped other schools to develop their e-safety strategy. Her tips are:

  • Good leadership around e-safety is essential. Governors and the school leadership team need to make it a priority.
  • Parents need to take responsibility for e-safety at home. Train your parent governor so they can champion e-safety to parents.
  • Don’t reinvent the wheel. Policies on behaviour, safeguarding and substance misuse all relate e-safety. These can be a good place to start when writing your e-safety policy.
  • Remember everyone is responsible for e-safety. Not just the member of staff appointed to take the lead.
  • Embed e-safety across the whole curriculum. Make e-safety a topic that can be taught in any subject whether that’s an essay in English, an e-safety poster in art and or coding in computing.
  • Not sure where to start in your school? Try https://www.360safe.org.uk/

Follow Zoe on Twitter: @ZoeRoss16
Follow Yvonne on Twitter: @epictsuk

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Supporting the government’s ‘Digital by Default’ strategy we’re keen everyone has the skills and confidence to use IT. Here, we share thoughts on a variety of digital matters.

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