Prince Charles' IT proclivities?

Brian RuncimanHere at oddIT House we specialise in the weird, odd, strange and freaky. And IT stuff too.

Prince Charles is not someone you'd normally associate with cutting-edge tech, and yet here is something he'd surely like: a way to water your plants via mobile phone. If only you could talk to them as well...
http://blog.wired.com/sterling/2008/02/spime-watch-twi.html

Physics is not just in the remit of geniuses either - all you need are a few PS3s and you're away.
http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2008/02/28/ps3s_put_to_use_
simulating_blackholes/

In a shameless plug for May ITNOW's ethics features, here's a story that proves that guns don't kill people, robots do:
http://www.bcs.org/server.php?show=conBlogPost.336

Not really - in fact they may even be more ethical than a human in a battle situation.

All this and more is in the oddIT podcast episode 33. www.bcs.org/podcasts

Regular listeners will know that hapless assistant editor Justin Richards often gets ribbed for his tenuous grasp of what constitutes technology, but in this episode I'm guilty. I just couldn't resist a story about 'creative geographer' Trevor Paglen, who began mapping and monitoring the US military's secret 'black sites' with his Limit Telephotography process.

He discovered a subculture of workers employed at these sites who, despite the heavily-enforced veil of secrecy surrounding their work, have formed social organisations, attend alumni dinners, and even hand out awards to each other for secret jobs well-done. Paglen started collecting patches used by them, as explained in his new book, the snappily titled 'I Could Tell You but Then You Would Have to Be Destroyed by Me: Emblems from the Pentagon's Black World'.

Enjoy!

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About the author

Brian is Head of Content at BCS and blogs about the Institute’s role in making IT good for society, historical developments in computing, the implications of CS research and more.

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