Innovate the Future

David Croslin

Published by

Prentice Hall

ISBN

978-0-13-705515-9

RRP

$29.99

Reviewed by

Sheila Bullas MBCS CITP

Score

9 out of 10

Innovate the FutureMany small companies owe their very existence to their ability to innovate. Larger more established companies often find innovation difficult to achieve, almost stifling this important mechanism through the business processes they adopt.

David Croslin draws on his deep understanding of innovation to provide a detailed step-by-step method for developing and marketing innovative products, services and processes: products that provide transformative value for the consumer; value that may be actual or perceived.  

David is President of Innovate the Future, a consultancy that specialises in customer, product and market innovation. He was formerly Chief Technologist with Hewlett Packard’s communications, media and entertainment division and holds twenty-five patents.

The book starts by providing a detailed discussion of what constitutes an innovation, what leads a consumer to obtain an innovative product or service and the life cycle of an innovation. He explores the progression from an idea to an invention to an innovative product that a consumer will buy. He discusses how a consumer perceives value and the trigger point that results in a buying decision.

In the second part, David investigates how innovation fits into business life cycles and sets out the problems that can stifle innovation within otherwise successful companies. There is a useful checklist of items to start the innovation cycle.

Part three looks at targeting innovation: starting from scratch, IT solutions innovation and the achievement of various company positions (e.g. market domination) through innovation. The final part deals with the deployment of innovation in the chosen market.

This is a very readable book and will be of interest to those who are involved in the development of products or services in companies large and small. It will be of particular use to inventors who want to see their inventions become innovations and transform the lifestyle of their target consumers.

Further Information: Prentice Hall

September 2010