Linux Web Operations Live Lessons (Video Training)

Ben Whaley

Published by

Prentice Hall

ISBN

9780133927627

RRP

£190

Reviewed by

Uma Kanagaratnam MBCS, Senior Product Support Specialist

Score

8 out of 10

This video training focuses on the integration of several essential components of web operations such as network protocols, operating systems, security and databases.

Each lesson starts with an introductory overview of the topic, and the whole package comprises of eight lessons, constituting approximately seven hours of useful guidance. The demonstrations and tools are indicative of what to be expected in the real world.

The lessons are structured as follows:

Lesson 1 - Induction to the basic components of a traditional web application stack and how they interact.

Lesson 2 - Databases (clear differentiation between relational DBMS and NoSQL, master/slave replication for high availability).

Lesson 3 - Presenting Apache and Nginx web servers and the use of haproxy load balancer.

Lesson 4 - DNS, which is an essential tool for web operations to ensure high availability.

Lesson 5 - The need for monitoring to preserve the availability of the web application and establishing what to capture, alert and monitor.

Lesson 6 - The importance of configuration management to reduce human error and ensure knowledge distribution.

Lesson 7 - Review cryptography to preserve confidentiality of data.

Lesson 8 - Conclusion, with an example of virtualisation technology - ‘containers’ for maximum portability and ease of deployment.

Ben has good presentation skills. He clearly introduces each section, and does not provide any unnecessary or irrelevant information. While he could vary his tone at times, overall he was engaging..

The video scores 8/10 in terms of content and value for money. The lessons are clearly presented. The hands-on demonstrations are a useful guide. Overall it is a good introduction to web applications for beginners concentrating on the core components. The lack of ability to access participation needs and address real time enquiry is a drawback.

Further information: Prentice Hall

February 2015