Designing Scalable .NET Applications

    Joachim Rossberg and Rickard Redler

    Publisher Apress
    ISBN 978-1-59059-214-4
    RRP US$59.99
    Reviewed by Tim Onions CEng MBCS
    Score 4 out of 10

    DesignScalableNET

    Any book that attempts to cover a topic as broad as the title implies must, by necessity, be either an epic of back-breaking proportions or of slimmer build and merely introduce each of the many topics involved.

    In this case it is very much the latter, with clustering, architecture, the Windows operating system, web services, security, active directory, MS message queue, IIS and SQL Server all covered with, of course, a strong emphasis placed on .NET.

    Design is covered using the UML techniques of activity diagrams, class diagrams, sequence diagrams and use cases. Each UML technique is introduced and a simple example given – the reader is going to have to look elsewhere to learn how to use UML for real.

    The level of detail throughout is such that no topic is ever explained in sufficient depth to actually get down and dirty and build. The target audience is IT architects and solution providers who need to know what a scalable application in the .NET environment should look like and the techniques to use.

    Reference is made to a number of resources and documents available online at the Microsoft site which is not a fault per se but does serve to emphasize that everything needed to design those scalable .NET Applications is not actually held within.

    There are many hints and tips dotted about throughout the book, useful in their own way, and the book concludes with details of a sample application built using the techniques outlined (including some sample C# classes). There is even a section giving recommendations on development and test environments.

    This would be a useful high-level overview to anybody coming new to .NET wishing to understand the areas of importance. Those who have already worked in .NET are going to feel short-changed and would be better off searching the web directly for those more detailed resources.

    More information: Apress