Society Article Archive

  • Tech issues have never been more central to government policy and decision-making, with choices taken now liable to affect us for decades. Theo Knott reports on two areas, internet safety and AI, where BCS has been influencing government decisions recently.
  • In May 2018, Prof Steve Furber CBE spoke to Manchester Branch BCS, about how Acorn RISC machines evolved into the Spiking Neural Network Architecture. Julian M. Bass FBCS reports.
  • Open banking is poised to radically change the way personal finances work over the next 10 years. Kelly Read-Parish, Head of Operations at challenger credit bureau Credit Kudos, explores how.
  • Peter Hopton explores the physics and the factors that are slowing internet access today and presents a vision of a high speed, low power and low latency future.
  • Prof. John Stein, Magdalen College, Oxford, explores how dyslexia works and explains why the condition might be a profound positive when it comes to designing software.
  • Ian Hughes, Senior IoT Analyst at 451 Research and Chair BCS Animation and Games SG, stops playing Fortnite and asks what 5G might mean for the future of interactive entertainment.
  • A Past-President of BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, Elizabeth Sparrow FBCS is a respected author and consultant, specialising in outsourcing relationships and change management programmes.
  • To coincide with International Women’s Day, the BCS North London Branch ran the first of a series of ‘Wominspiration’ events that aim to shine a light on some of the talented women currently working in the IT arena, with the aim of helping inspire the next generation.
  • In a world where technological advances can create an undesirable future, there is an ever stronger call for more ethical research. Responsible research and innovation are a must. Margherita Nulli, Bernd Stahl, Carolyn Ten Holter and Martin de Heaver report.
  • Whether an organisation is now large and powerful, or is in a garage in Silicon Valley waiting to launch the next disruptive wave, there is a feeling that IT has lost sight of basic social philosophies, and the ethics and fairness that underpin them.