Society Article Archive

  • Barry Blundell looks at the ethics of computing as it progresses. 'It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity.' Edwin Black, IBM and the holocaust.
  • The streaming of video and audio, via the web, has potential for use in practical lessons and classes where events need to be recorded. Alan Oxley looks at the teaching methods of the future.
  • BCS talk to Sir Maurice Wilkes, BCS President 1957/60 and Nigel Shadbolt, BCS President 2006/07.
  • In considering public sector services and how IT could change them a number of very practical constraints need to be considered, before we get too carried away with what's possible.
  • It's five years in the future and more and more people are working from home. It can be cheaper for businesses as they now don't have to rent expensive offices just to seat people.
  • There are many ways to develop an understanding of coming developments in technology and to evolve business plans to take advantage of these advances. However, most methods tend to foster linear thinking and therefore a vision of the future firmly rooted in the present day.
  • The very nature of the IT industry makes it a slave to the zeitgeist.
  • Most people accept that hard work is of value, and that people are well within their moral rights to ask for payment for their work.
  • Doing business with the world's emerging markets requires radical innovations in technology, business models and design methodologies, says Apala Lahiri Chavan, managing director of Human Factors International India.
  • Karen Spärck Jones is winner of the 2007 BCS Lovelace Medal, BCS managing editor Brian Runciman interviewed her.