Surfing the Internet: what's the worst that could happen? You can lose your privacy, your money and even your identity. But what about your reputation, your job, your marriage and even your liberty?

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AGENDA
18:00 – Refreshments and networking
18:30 – Main presentation
19:30 – Q&A
20:00 – Close

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Synopsis:

Surfing the Internet: what's the worst that could happen? You can lose your privacy, your money and even your identity. But what about your reputation, your job, your marriage and even your liberty?

Computer viruses and Trojans (or malware) often arise during the investigation of cyber crime. How do we know if this is a genuine case of mistaken identify or if the suspect is simply trying to hide behind a Trojan Defence? A forensic investigation of your computer might reveal the 'truth', but how reliable is this 'truth' when tools not even designed for forensic use are employed to reach these conclusions? In light of previous miscarriages of justice (and personal experience as an investigator), greater levels of scientific practice are called for in the tendering of forensic evidence.

This talk gives an insight into recent research that sought to develop a scientific methodology to evaluate the tools used to undertake malware forensics.

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Speaker: Ian Kennedy PhD CEng PGCE MBCS CITP

Following his career as a C++ programmer and commissioning engineer for bespoke software systems for clients such as Nymex, Chicago Board of Trade and NHS Trusts, Ian's interest in security exploits led to over a decade of experience as a Forensic Computer investigator. This experience was initially within Law Enforcement, then within the commercial sector dealing with international litigation issues and finally elsewhere at a national level. Since 2008, Ian has been teaching and assessing for the Open University (OU) on their post-graduate Computer Forensics modules. In 2014 he became a full-time academic (alongside his ongoing role with the OU) with Canterbury Christ Church University, where he has been the Programme Director for the undergraduate Computer Forensics and Security programme.

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Booking: Both BCS members and non-members are welcome. There is no charge.

For more information about this group, go to - https://www.bcs.org/category/18344

Please note, duplicate names will be deleted.

For overseas delegates who wish to attend the event please note that BCS does not issue invitation letters.

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PRESENTATION
Malware forensics analysis tools (PDF)

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Bringing Science to the Evaluation of Malware Forensics Analysis Tools - Kent Branch
Date and time
28 March, 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Location
University of Kent
Room SW101
School of Computing, Cornwallis South
Canterbury
Kent
CT2 7NF
Price
This event is sold out