Articles from Volume 3, Number 3

  • In order to facilitate interoperability and pan-European record sharing, the European Health Records Institute is developing European health record standards, which will become a requirement for vendors in the EU. To give the UK a voice in this, ProRec-UK has been set up.
  • Jean Roberts asks whether health informatics is growing up in her article 'Is health informatics growing up?' This is a question asked frequently over the years, only to be dashed by another setback.
  • A selection of articles outlining recent IT-related news in healthcare.
  • BCS Health Informatics Forum will be overseeing the whole of the Healthcare Computing event this year for the first time with Citadel Events contracted to manage commercial participation.
  • Martin Bellamy, head of NHS Connecting for Health (NHS CFH) and director of programme and systems delivery, Department of Health, is giving a one-hour keynote address on day two of the HC2009 conference. He gave Helen Wilcox a flavour of some of the themes of his presentation, covering the IT foundations already in place to priorities for the next 12 months.
  • IHE-UK, a member of the BCS Health Informatics Forum, works on secure sharing of clinical documents and images. Nick Brown, chairman of IHE-UK steering committee, explains more about the organisation and invites you to drop by its stand at HC2009.
  • The various initiatives in the health informatics arena, from brand identity to education, are continually making progress. Jean Roberts looks at how health informatics has been changing.
  • Papers for Medinfo 2010 must be submitted by 30 September 2009. The theme is 'Partnerships for effective e-health solutions'. Dr Peter Murray, IMIA vice president for working groups and special interest groups, describes the event and how to participate.
  • The US is about to embark on a national programme to reform healthcare using IT. John Robinson, GP and clinical advisor to PRIMIS, reports on presentations about the programme at the AMIA conference, and lessons the UK and US could learn from each other.
  • Paramedics have started recording patient information electronically, instead of using pen and paper. The ongoing roll-out of the new service in a large part of England earned CSC a BCS Industry Award in the mobile technology category.
  • A tool that tackles the problem of chemotherapy capacity planning landed Concentra two BCS Industry Awards in the social and business-to-business categories. The tool, which employs advanced modelling techniques, is used for service improvement and planning, and can simulate scenarios in chemotherapy units.
  • A selection of BCS health informatics events.
  • Health Informatics Scotland is planning to ramp up its activities this year under the leadership of recently appointed chair Paul Woolman. He's keen to recruit new committee members to help drive the group forward.
  • The Northern Specialist Group heard a presentation on 'connecting up healthcare - a view from the NHS Technology Office' by its chief technology officer Dr Paul Jones on 22 January.
  • 'Patient safety - who cares?' is the title of the BCS Primary Health Care Specialist Group (PHCSG) 2009 Summer Conference.
  • The ASSIST National Conference 2009 will be held on 4 June at the National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham. Detailed planning for the conference is well under way.
  • As use of web 2.0 tools becomes all pervasive, how can health and social care services embrace the technological, sociological and cultural changes to form part of the future of healthcare information? A BCS Thought Leadership Debate considered that question.