Does Software Engineering have a Positive or Negative impact on Software Engineering practice

Kingston & Croydon Branch event

Date/Time:
Tuesday 13th November 2007. 7.00 pm for 7.30. Ends 9.00pm

Venue:
BT Delta Point, 35 Wellesley Road, West Croydon. Near to West Croydon Rail and Bus Stations; and 8 mins walk from East Croydon Railway Station.

Speaker:
Professor Alex Wolf.

Prof. Alexander Wolf is a professor in the department of Computing at Imperial College, London. He also holds affiliated appointments at the University of Colorado at Boulder and the University of Lugano.

His research interests are directed toward the discovery of principles and development of technologies to support the engineering of large, complex software systems, networking, security, and data base management.

Summary:
Incontrovertible is the enormous change in software engineering practice that has occurred over the past decades. The worldwide software industry now generates hundreds of billions of US dollars in revenue annually and continues to expand in scope and revenue volume. Indeed, the software industry is increasingly acknowledged as a key driver of both social and economic growth.

In view of this, it seems important to consider to what extent industrial and academic software engineering research has had impact on the practice of software engineering.  A group has formed to consider this question, taking a scholarly and methodical look into the origins of several critical elements of the practice, including high-level programming languages, configuration management tools, distributed middleware, testing, and architecture.

Who cares about the answer to this question? Obviously software engineering researchers, but also practitioners who are looking for help to do what they do better, and those in government and industry trying to decide how best to spend their precious little research budget.

Everyone is welcome. Refreshments provided. Admission is free.

PDF file Professor Alex Wolf's introduction (66 kb)
PDF file Professor Alex Wolf's presentation (271 kb)