Working hours and benefits

Full and part-time working

Female IT specialists almost 5 times more likely to work part-time

Just 6% of IT specialists were working part-time in 2016 compared with 27% of all UK workers, though the incidence of part-time working was higher amongst IT specialists from each of the minority groups than their ‘non-minority’ counterparts in all cases bar those from non-white ethnic groups. In particular, female IT specialists were almost five times as likely to be working part-time as males working in IT positions.

Figure 18: IT inclusion and the incidence of part-time working, 2016
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Figure 18: IT inclusion and the incidence of part-time working, 2016
Source: Analysis of ONS Quarterly Labour Force Survey by BCS

Part-time working more often a lifestyle choice for IT specialists and women in particular

Working part-time is a lifestyle choice for many people, but for approximately 10% of all IT specialists in 2016 this mode of working was an enforced one as they were unable to find the full-time work desired. Interestingly, the likelihood that IT specialists from minority groups as a whole were unable to find full-time work was lower at 8% though in the case of those from ethnic minority groups the figure was more than double this level at 21%.

Perhaps the most striking difference between minority/non-minority groups however is the proportion of female IT specialists that had taken part-time work due to an inability to find full-time jobs which was less than a quarter of that registered amongst males in IT positions.[1]

Figure 19: Part-time IT specialists unable to find full-time work,(2014-16)
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Figure 19: Part-time IT specialists unable to find full-time work,(2014-16)
Source: Analysis of ONS Quarterly Labour Force Survey by BCS

Remuneration

Earnings amongst female and disabled IT specialists are well below the norm

On average, IT specialists are well paid compared with other workers and in 2016, the gross weekly (median) wage for people working in (full-time, permanent) IT positions was 36% higher than the norm at £770 per week compared with a figure of £500 per week for all employees.

Surprisingly perhaps, IT specialists from minority groups were found to have higher weekly earnings (£800 per week) and this is down to the impact of earnings data for those aged 50 and above and those from non-white ethnic groups – both of which reported earnings levels much higher than their counterparts (i.e. 19% and 13% higher respectively than younger/ white workers).

For women and disabled IT specialists however, the reverse was true and whilst male IT specialists reported earnings of £780 per week, females in the same profession were receiving 15% less (£660 per week), whilst IT specialists with disabilities were found to be earning 16% less than their non-disabled counterparts (i.e. £660pw and £780pw respectively).

Figure 20: IT inclusion and (median) weekly earnings for full-time employees, 2016
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Figure 20: IT inclusion and (median) weekly earnings for full-time employees, 2016
Source: Analysis of ONS Quarterly Labour Force Survey by BCS

Older IT specialists and those from ethnic minority groups earn more

It could of course, be argued that weekly rates of pay, even amongst full-time staff, are affected by many factors - not least hours worked. Indeed, accounting for the number of working hours does change the picture slightly, however this analysis still shows women in IT positions were earning 11% less than their male co-workers in 2016 and those classified as being disabled earning 13% less than IT specialists without disabilities.

Figure 21: IT inclusion and (median) hourly earnings for full-time employees, 2016
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Figure 21: IT inclusion and (median) hourly earnings for full-time employees, 2016
Source: Analysis of ONS Quarterly Labour Force Survey by BCS

[1] Three year averages, treat with caution low base sizes, see data notes.